Fatal accident news

 

HSE reveals workplace fatal injury statistics

The Health and Safety Executive (HSE), the independent workplace safety regulator which protects employees from harm by enforcing employer accountability for unsafe working environments, has published its annual report, Workplace Fatal Injuries in Great Britain 2018.

Which sector has the most fatal workplace injuries?

The provisional statistics reveal a slight increase in workplace deaths in 2017/2018 compared to the previous year. 144 workers were fatally injured. The construction industry recorded the largest number of fatal injuries overall - 38 construction workers were killed. The waste and recycling and agricultural sectors had the highest fatal injury rates per 100,000 workers.

Fatal injuries to workers whilst travelling on a public highway or whilst commuting, travelling by sea or air, whilst on duty in the armed forces or through natural causes unrelated to work were excluded from the HSE report as these are regulated by the police and other authorities. Deaths from asbestos-related mesothelioma were also excluded, forming the subject of a separate report.

What are the most common causes of fatal injury in the workplace?

The HSE reported that the most common causes of death, across all industries, were due to:

  • falling from heights
  • being struck by moving vehicles
  • being struck by moving objects
  • being trapped by something collapsing or overturning
  • contact with moving machinery

Other causes included:

  • being injured by an animal
  • slipping, tripping or falling on the same level
  • drowning or asphyxiation
  • contact with electricity
  • exposure to fire

The UK consistently has one of the lowest rates of workplace fatal injury in Europe, but at nearly three ‘entirely preventable’ deaths a week, Craig Foyle, President of the Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (IOSH), described the number of fatalities as ‘unacceptable’, particularly given the additional numbers of serious injuries not covered by this report and the huge emotional and financial impact on the bereaved families.  

The Health and Safety Executive’s stated mission is to prevent work-related death, injury and ill health in the belief that ‘everyone has the right to come home safe and well from their job’ – a sentiment that Boyes Turner wholeheartedly support.

How can Boyes Turner help?

As specialists in personal injury, acting for individuals who have been seriously disabled in workplace accidents and the bereaved, dependent families of those who have died owing to unsafe workplace environments, we understand the emotional impact and financial implications of losing a beloved family member and major breadwinner. Where a disabling or fatal injury has occurred, we act fast to secure liability judgments or admissions and interim compensation payments to alleviate the financial hardship caused by the accident. In cases of serious injury, we can help our clients access physical and vocational rehabilitation, psychological counselling and specialist equipment, offering our client the best prospect of an early recovery and return to work. Where a return to work is not possible we ensure that our clients’ loss of earnings and pension losses are included in their claim.

If you have suffered the loss of a loved one, or a disabling injury in a workplace setting and would like to discuss a potential claim please contact us by email at piclaims@boyesturner.com.

Protecting your head and brain at work

Every year thousands of people suffer a brain injury whilst at work. These brain injuries can range from mild injuries right through to severe brain injuries where people are left in a vegative state.

Statistical data published by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) has also revealed that 137 people died in the workplace during the period of 2016/2017, 20 of which were as a result of being hit by a moving/falling object.

Boyes Turner sadly have dealt with a high number of cases where people have suffered a brain injury at work, or where someone has passed away as a result of a work place accident. 

To try and help workers protect their head and brain at work we have put together the following list of helpful tips:

Hard hats

Hard hats are available for workers that have been specifically designed to protect the head from falling objects.

If your employer has provided you with a hard hat make sure you wear it at all times. Also ensure that you wear your hard hat correctly, this means:

  1. Wearing the chin strap to prevent it from falling off.
  2. Ensuring the hat is adjusted to fit the head comfortably, but firmly.
  3. Wearing it the correct way, i.e. not back to front.

Also, if your hard hat becomes damaged at all, ask your employer for a replacement, do not continue to wear a damaged hard hat as it will not offer the same protection as an un-damaged hard hat.

If your employer does not provide you with a hard hat, but you think you would benefit from one, discuss it with him/her.Your employer can then conduct a risk assessment and if necessary arrange for a hard hat to be provided to you.

And remember, hard hats are not just for construction workers, hard hats can be worn by a number of other professions such as factory workers and miners and now they are available in different styles such as baseball caps like the one pictured below.

The benefit of a baseball cap hard hat is that it may be more suitable for customer facing roles such as the front of house staff at a trade counter in a warehouse where the employee has to face customers, but also take regular trips in to the warehouse where there is a risk of falling objects.

Warning signs

If you are an employer, always post warning signs to warn employees of areas where there is a risk of being struck by falling objects.These areas of risk can easily be identified by a good risk assessment.If in doubt ask a health and safety specialist to advise your business on the risks affecting your employees.

Employers should also provide hard hats for its employees it expects to work in areas where there is a risk of falling objects and post signs reminding employees to wear there hard hats in those areas.

If you are en employee, make yourself aware of areas where falling object signs have been placed and be extra vigilant when walking through those areas, making sure you wear your hard hat all times in those areas.

Safety netting and barriers

If a risk assessment has identified an area where there is a risk of falling objects, install barriers or netting systems to catch falling objects before they land on an employee.

Whilst a hard hat will offer some protection to an employee from a falling object, a safety net or barrier will prevent the employee from being struck in the first place.

When it comes to safety nets and barriers, ensure they are suitable to catch the weight of the item(s) that could fall and that they are fitted by professionals.

Health and safety training

As an employer it is essential to provide suitable health and safety training to employees whose work may cause items to drop on to others, crane drivers for example, and to educate workers who are at risk from falling objects and how to avoid being struck by them.

Thereafter the employees should receive regular refresher training on these risks to ensure that safety is at the forefront of their mind and that they know how to prevent accidents occurring as a result of falling objects.

The employer should also police good health and safety procedures in the workplace by posting signs in the workplace reminding people of their duties and reminding people of their duties if they are caught breaching the site health and safety rules.

Sporting equipment

If you are a semi-professional or professional sportsman then your club may also provide you with essential equipment to protect you from head injuries such as a cricket helmet or a bicycle helmet.

Always ensure you wear this equipment, even during routine practice sessions to avoid the risk of injury.

Protecting yourself

Please also bear in mind there are many professions where the wearing of protective headgear is not a legal requirement and therefore an employer may not provide you with it.An example would be a bicycle courier. The wearing of cycle helmets is not a mandatory requirement and therefore your employer may not provide you with a good bicycle helmet. It is however known that thousands of cyclists suffer head injuries each year as a result of cycling accidents where a cycle helmet was not worn.

If you have a job such as this, speak to your employer to see if a cycle helmet could be provided. If the employer is unwilling to provide one then you may wish to consider investing in one yourself. Many cycle helmets can be purchased for a relatively low price now and the price will be well worth it were you to fall off of your bicycle.

The above list is just a snapshot of ways you could protect yourself from head injuries in the workplace.

If you or someone you know has suffered a head injury as a result of an accident at work please contact us by email piclaims@boyesturner.com

If someone you know has passed away as a result of a head injury please also contact us to see if a claim can be made on behalf of their estate.

Is the Boyes Turner personal injury team right for you?

When someone has suffered a personal injury it is essential that they pick the right solicitor to assist them with their claim.

Carefully selecting the correct solicitor will ensure that you have:

  1. Access to up to date legal advice.
  2. Advice from a large network of specialists that we work with, such as medical experts, barristers, financial and welfare benefit advisors, employment and educational experts, housing and conveyancing specialists, and more.
  3. Access to specialist care and rehabilitation providers to assist you in your recovery journey.
  4. A speedy conclusion of your claim.
  5. Peace of mind that you will receive the compensation you need to secure your future.

No two claims are the same, even if the injuries are similar or if they were injured in the same accident. Thankfully Boyes Turner’s team of dedicated personal injury specialists are able to advise on all types of personal injury claims from minor injuries right through to life changing injuries such as brain injuries, spinal injuries and amputations.

Below we give you a quick introduction to the partners in the team and the specialisms they hold.

Kim Smerdon

Kim Smerdon leads Boyes Turner’s highly regarded personal injury team. A specialist in catastrophic injury cases, Kim acts for clients with acquired brain damage, spinal injuries and serious orthopaedic injuries.

Kim has extensive experience of all types of personal injury cases and has acted for clients who have been injured in road traffic accidents, in the workplace, as a result of defective products and criminal injuries.

A keen charity fundraiser, Kim recently completed the 3 Peaks Challenge, climbing Ben Nevis, Scafell Pike and Snowdon in 24 hours to raise over £35,000 for The Debbie Fund, a charity set up to raise funds for research into cervical cancer.

Kim is a member of the Law Society’s Personal Injury Panel and an accredited senior litigator and brain injury specialist with the Association of Personal Injury Lawyers (APIL). She is an associate member of the Child Brain Injury Trust, and a member of the Brain Injury Social Work Group, Headway and Spinal Injuries Panel Solicitors. She is a Headway Life Member, a trustee of Headway Thames Valley and trustee of the Bicycle Helmet Initiative Trust, a charity committed to saving young people’s lives by promoting safer cycling and benefits of using a cycle helmet. 

Claire Roantree

As a partner in Boyes Turner’s highly regarded personal injury team, Claire acts for clients with life-changing injuries, such as mild to very severe brain injury, spinal cord injury, amputation, severe burns, complex orthopaedic and musculoskeletal injury, chronic pain and PTSD. 

Claire works closely with the defendant insurers, using the Rehabilitation Code and securing interim payments to provide her injured clients with the treatment, care, facilities and support that they need to get their rehabilitation underway straight away, without losing valuable recovery time whilst waiting for final settlement at the conclusion of the claim. Working with experts in a variety of medical and therapeutic disciplines, professional case managers and carers, the client’s immediate needs are prioritised – recovery and rehabilitation – whilst the claim is quantified to make maximum provision  for their future needs for ongoing care, support and financial security.

A keen charity supporter and fundraiser she has used her love of running and walking to fundraise for The Children's Trust, Tadworth. She has run events for Headway SW London for whom she was a trustee for six years. She is a trustee for Cycle Smart and supports the charity’s campaign to raise cycling safety awareness and reduce road traffic accidents. 

Claire is a member of the Law Society's Personal Injury Panel, APIL (Brain Injury Specialist Interest Group), Headway and ABIL (Acquired Brain Injury across London).

As you can see there is no type of claim that the team cannot handle and together they are confident that they can assist you in achieving the best recovery possible as well as the justice and compensation you deserve.

If you would like to speak to our specialist personal injury team please do not hesitate to contact us for a free no obligation advice by email piclaims@boyesturner.com.

Scaffolding and workplace accidents falling, says NASC 2018 Safety Report

The 2018 Safety Report of the National Access and Scaffolding Confederation (NASC) has revealed that the number of workplace accidents and serious injuries reported by its members reached an all-time low in 2017.

What were the 2018 Safety Report findings?

NASC members reported no fatalities at all. Out of a total 89 workplace accidents, there were only 17 major injuries – a reduction both in incidents and injuries from the previous year. In particular, falls from heights had reduced by 46% compared to 2016 and no members of the public were injured around NASC members’ scaffolding.

As the trade body for access and scaffolding in the UK, NASC provides HSE approved safety and technical guidance for scaffolding contractors, their workforce and their clients. Established in 1945, NASC’s membership currently extends to over 240 leading contracting firms, scaffolding manufacturers and businesses, representing more than 16,000 scaffolding workers. NASC’s members undergo strict auditing to make sure that they comply with the highest possible standards of safety. In this way, NASC provides the construction industry with an assurance that its members will be trained, behave and work according to its benchmark codes of conduct, practice and safety.

The President of NASC commended the latest report’s findings as a demonstration of what can be achieved in terms of reduction of workplace accidents through strict compliance with NASC’s industry benchmark standards. Since 2012 reported numbers and frequency of accidents amongst NASC members have reduced by over a third. He reiterated, however, that workplace falls on the same level to remain prevalent and can lead to serious injury or death. Health and safety compliance remains the key to the reduction of workplace injuries.

What can Boyes Turner do to help?

Boyes Turner’s serious injury lawyers welcome the positive findings of the NASC’s 2018 Safety Report. As experts in brain injury, spinal injury severe disability, mesothelioma and asbestos-related disease claims, we help clients who have been disabled by accidents in the workplace, in hospitals, and on the roads, or who have lost family members upon whom they were financially dependent to obtain the rehabilitation and financial compensation that they need to rebuild their lives.

If you or a member of your family has been seriously injured after a fall from height at work and would like to discuss a claim please contact a member of our specialist personal injury team by email piclaims@boyesturner.com.

Cervical Cancer Prevention Week - RCOG call for increased screening uptake

During Cervical Cancer Prevention Week, Boyes Turner welcome the FSRH (Faculty of Sexual & Reproductive Healthcare of the Royal College of Obstetricians & Gynaecologists) and RCOG’s call for urgent action to increase cervical screening attendance rates.

If you’ve been following Jo’s Trust’s campaign #SmearForSmear you’ll already know the importance and the benefits of regular cervical screening in reducing your risk of cancer. However, NHS Digital have reported that attendance for free, NHS cervical screening during NHS Cervical Screening Programme 2016-17 was at its lowest in 20 years. Whilst increasing numbers of women are being invited for screening, the uptake in the highest risk age group of 25 to 49-year-olds was only 69.6%.

Suggested reasons for the low attendance rate include local authority budget-driven cuts reducing the number of local settings in which cervical screening is offered, such as SRH clinics. Meanwhile, overburdened GPs are missing opportunities to catch those who have missed out by offering opportunistic appointments for screening at their surgeries.

These additional barriers are simply compounding the problem already encountered with existing barriers (such as fear, lack of awareness) which charities like Jo’s Trust are working so hard to overcome, making it more important than ever to raise awareness of the life-saving benefits of attending your appointment and having your smear.

Early detection of abnormal cells is the key to the avoidance of cervical cancer, along with HPV vaccination among pre-teen and teenage girls.

When left undetected and untreated, cervical cancer not only causes death, but leaves its survivors with lifelong physical, emotional and psychological injury.

Join us and Jo’s Trust, this Cervical Cancer Prevention Week, in urging female friends and family to #ReduceYourRisk and join us in promoting cervical cancer prevention by posting your lipstick #SmearForSmear selfie. For details on how to get involved, click here.

Should cohabitees receive bereavement damages

This was a question recently faced by the Court of Appeal after Ms Jakki Smith took the Secretary of State for Justice to Court for breaching her human rights.

Who can claim bereavement damages?

The Fatal Accidents Act 1976 gives rise to the right to claim bereavement damages. The Act allows the wife, husband or civil partner of the deceased to claim damages for their bereavement. Payment is also made to the parents of the deceased where the deceased was a minor. The current payment for bereavement damages is £12,980. At the time that Ms Smith’s partner, John Bulloch, died it was £11,800 and this was the amount she was seeking.

Does a cohabitee get anything?

Unlike the payment for bereavement damages, which a cohabitee is not entitled to claim under the Act, a cohabitee can claim for a financial dependency on the deceased. This claim is possible where the deceased and his partner have been cohabiting for at least 2 years before the death and have been cohabiting as husband and wife.

What was Ms Smith’s case?

Ms Smith argued that by excluding her from those people entitled to claim bereavement damages the Government was breaching her Human Rights. The Court of Appeal agreed with Ms Smith and found that section 1A of the Fatal Accidents Act 1976 was incompatible with Article 14 in conjunction with Article 8 of the European Convention on Human Rights.

Unfortunately, although Ms Smith’s case will set a precedent for other unmarried cohabiting partners to seek bereavement damages, she will not benefit from the decision. This is because although the Secretary of State was acting in a way which was incompatible with Ms Smith’s convention rights, they could not have acted differently due to the provision of the Fatal Accidents Act which does not allow cohabitees to claim bereavement damages.  

How does this affect mesothelioma and asbestos claims?

In giving his judgment Sir Terence Etherton MR commented on the declining “popularity of the institution of marriage and the increase in the number of cohabiting couples”. According to the Office of National Statistics in a report on “Families and Households” in 2015, “cohabiting couples continues to be the fastest growing family type in the UK, reaching 3.2 million cohabiting families”.

This decision can be used as a precedent to persuade defendants that bereavement damages should be paid to cohabitees in line with financial dependency claims under the Fatal Accidents Act 1976. 

Bereavement damages frequently form a part of mesothelioma and asbestos claims and therefore this is a decision which will benefit a number of our clients. However, the Fatal Accidents Act 1976 has not yet changed to allow a statutory entitlement to bereavement damages for cohabitees and we look forward to seeing a change to the Fatal Accidents Act 1976 in the near future.
 

Cervical Cancer Prevention Week - Reducing the Risk of HPV

During Cervical Cancer Prevention Week Boyes Turner are supporting cervical cancer charity, Jo’s Trust, in raising awareness about cervical cancer. The theme of this year’s prevention week is “Reduce Your Risk”, and that of those you care for, by understanding how this devastating condition can be recognised, treated and prevented. 

We now know that the vast majority of cervical cancer cases are caused by HPV, or the human papilloma virus, an infection passed on by any form of sexual contact. So, let’s be clear about a few facts at the outset:

  • 80% of people will be infected with a genital HPV infection at some time in their lives.
  • Your first or only sexual contact with anyone at all can put you at risk.
  • HPV infection does not imply sexual promiscuity or infidelity.

The problem with HPV is that, whilst it is very common, it is a symptomless infection. It can go undetected in the body for many years. Some people’s strong immune systems enable them to clear themselves naturally of HPV. It is not known why some people’s bodies can and others’ can’t. In those who clear the infection, it can take about 12 to 18 months. Smoking is also known to inhibit the body’s ability to clear itself of HPV. When most people with HPV are unaware that they have been infected, it is not surprising that the infection is so widespread. It should be noted that merely having HPV does not in itself warrant treatment, but the silent yet prevalent existence of the infection makes screening for cervical cancer all the more important.

Most forms of HPV are harmless but some high-risk strains can cause changes in the cells of the cervix which, if undetected and treated, will ultimately lead to cervical cancer. If a smear test reveals abnormal cells and high-risk HPV you may be recalled for further examination.

Jo’s Trust estimates that 70% of cervical cancers are caused by just two high-risk types of HPV, both of which can now be prevented (in people who have not previously been infected) by HPV vaccinations which are currently available to girls on the NHS. In 2008 the NHS introduced free, routine HPV immunisation for girls aged 12 to 13, in the hope of protecting them from HPV before they become sexually active. Offered in schools but also available through GP surgeries, the vaccines are over 98% effective in preventing cervical abnormalities associated with the two high-risk HPV strains in women who have the full dose, and in preventing infection with new strains or reinfection of a cleared HPV. They are not effective where the person is already infected with HPV, which is why the NHS is offering immunisation to girls at such a young age.

With research indicating that the HPV vaccine could prevent two thirds of cervical cancers in women under the age of 30 by 2025, assuming 80% take-up of the vaccination, which is now being consistently achieved, there is good reason for optimism that we will succeed in overcoming this devastating condition.

Join us and Jo’s Trust, this Cervical Cancer Prevention Week, in urging female friends and family to #ReduceYourRisk and join us in promoting cervical cancer prevention by posting your lipstick #SmearForSmear selfie. For details on how to get involved, click here.

Cervical Cancer Prevention Week 2018 - Join us in supporting Jo's Trust's awareness campaign #SmearForSmear

From 22nd to 28th January Boyes Turner will be joining cervical cancer charity, Jo’s Trust, in urging women to #ReduceYourRisk - the theme of this year’s Cervical Cancer Prevention Week campaign - support the campaign by sharing your #SmearForSmear lipstick selfies to raise awareness.   

Cervical cancer is the most common cancer in women under 35, with 3,000 new cases diagnosed and 800 deaths from the disease in the UK each year. That’s two women dying each day from a disease that could be prevented in 75% of cases by cervical screening that is routinely available on the NHS for free.

A smear test only takes a few minutes once every three years for women aged 25 to 49 who, by virtue of their age, are most likely to develop cervical cancer, and every five years for women of 50 to 64. For women over 65, routine screening is only available to those who have had abnormal previous tests or who haven’t undergone screening from the age of 50. Every woman who is registered with a GP should be invited for screening. Yet the NHS reports that more than 1.2 million women could be risking their lives by not having a smear test, as attendance for cervical screening has dropped in the last year, leaving test rates the lowest that they have been for two decades.

Whilst the smear test only takes minutes, the impact of cervical cancer can last a lifetime - leaving partners and children bereaved and its treated survivors devastated by side-effects, such as infertility, premature menopause, impaired bowel and urinary function, painful sexual intercourse, fear of recurrence, pain and psychological damage.

Join us and Jo’s Trust, this Cervical Cancer Prevention Week, in urging female friends and family to #ReduceYourRisk and join us in promoting cervical cancer prevention by posting your lipstick #SmearForSmear selfie. For details on how to get involved, click here.

60 seconds with a medical negligence lawyer

Over the following year we will be sharing a series of question and answer articles about our day-to-day lives in the medical negligence team. This week, it’s Rachel Carey's turn, a solicitor in the team.

Rachel qualified in April 2016 and joined the medical negligence team at Boyes Turner in November 2016. Rachel’s clients have suffered obstetric and gynaecological injuries, Erb’s palsy, pressure sores, disability resulting from delayed diagnosis and treatment of cancer. She acts for the bereaved spouses and children of patients who have died as a result of negligent medical care.

What made you choose a career in medical negligence?

The driving force behind my decision to study law and specialise in claimant medical negligence work was my desire to help David, rather than Goliath. I have a keen interest in medicine and enjoy using my skills and expertise to help our clients get back on their feet or live a more fulfilling and stress free life following a medical accident. I find it incredibly satisfying to be in a position which allows me to guide clients through the legal process which I know many will find daunting and overwhelming.

Which personal skills does it take to succeed at this type of work? 

It is really important for a medical negligence solicitor to have empathy, be able to show understanding and have the ability to remain calm in stressful situations. As the majority of the medical accidents we deal with cause life changing injuries which devastating consequences to our clients and their families, I ensure that I always bear that in mind and treat them sensitively and patiently.

What is the most rewarding part of your work? 

I recently met with a young client’s Mum on a case where the hospital had admitted liability. She told me how relieved she was to know that, as a result of the compensation, her son, who has cerebral palsy, would be looked after and taken care of for the rest of his life when her and her husband were no longer able to. She was excited to be able to move into a more appropriately sized and adapted home which could cater for her son’s needs. I could see how much that meant to her and to know that the work I had been a part of had helped was incredibly rewarding and made me realise even more how important the work we do is for people.

Santa's little bikers need safety advice under the tree to go with their new wheels

Children are cycling on our busy roads at a younger and younger age, many from the age of five, according to new research from local child cyclist’s safety charity Cycle-Smart

With the Christmas peak in bike and helmet sales now upon us, the charity - as part of its #FiveSs campaign - is visiting schools across the Thames Valley to increase parent's and children's awareness of the need for properly fitted helmets and safer cycling practice - to mitigate risk of serious injury or death if new bikes and helmets are not accompanied by more effective, simple guidance on head protection and road safety. 

The national research from Cycle-Smart surveyed over 1,700 children in England aged 5-9, and found:

More than one in seven (15%) of 5-6 year olds now cycle on roads where there are cars;

The figure rises to 37% of 7-9 year olds;

Amongst boys in the 7-9 year old  44% were more likely to cycle on the road compared to 23% of girls;

Only 70% even own a helmet, and only 47% wear them every time they use their bike.

The last 6 months of road data (January- June 2017) shows a 24% increase in serious child cycling casualties compared to same 6 months last year.

Boyes Turner is proud to have sponsored a video for Cycle-Smart, released today, which gives simple to follow tips on helmet fitting and cycle safety.   

A snap-survey conducted last month by Cycle-Smart volunteers of 350 children, including 120 in the Reading, Newbury, Slough and wider Berkshire area, has revealed a worrying failure of children to wear properly fitted helmets:

Over 60% of under six-year-olds did not have straps secured properly under the chin or with the Y-shaped straps fitted correctly around the ears;

Over a quarter of under six-year-olds did not have the helmet positioned correctly on their heads.

For 6-14 year olds, over 40% didn’t have straps positioned and secured correctly, and 18% didn’t have the helmet positioned correctly on their heads.

Angela Lee, Founder and Chief Executive of Cycle-Smart, says:
"A lifetime of happy, healthy cycling is one of the greatest gifts parents can give their child. But a bike without a well-fitted helmet and the common-sense advice and training necessary to share the road with cars, vans and trucks could lead to unnecessary anguish. We're urging parents, bike shops and those responsible for educating our children to use the roads safely to come together to make sure this Christmas's bike bonanza leaves a safe and happy legacy in the New Year."

Claire Roantree, Trustee of Cycle-Smart and Partner at Boyes Turner LLP, says:
"Thousands of new bikes will be under the tree this Christmas. They're gifts that will create happier, healthier, more independent kids. However, it is an unavoidable fact that some of these bikes will lead to accidents. The risks shouldn't stop kids getting freer and fitter on their bikes. But it would be reckless if a major part of the gift wasn't parents, bike shops and schools coming together to ensure helmets are always well-fitted and advice is provided to the ever-younger kids sharing the roads with cars. We urge all parents of child cyclists to watch the Cycle-Smart video."

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