Charities news

 

Child Brain Injury Training Day

On Friday 12 October we at Boyes Turner were delighted to welcome case managers, therapists and many others who work with brain-injured children to our Child Brain Injury Training Day. 

The aim of the day was to highlight the issues a child with a brain injury can face but with an emphasis on the wider impact this can have on the family.

We hosted a number of wonderful speakers including: 

  • Sharmin Campbell - Director, Celsior Management - spoke about Care and Case Management reports - the legal perspective
  • Lindsay Oliver - SLT, Independent Living Solutions - gave a 30 minute guide to Speech and Language Therapy with Children with Brain Injuries
  • Marc Beale - Director, Malvern Solutions Ltd - spoke about how assistive technology can help increase independence for brain injured children and their families
  •  Joanne Foster & Kate Correal - Case Managers, North Star Case Management - gave us an insight into case management on the ground
  • Cheryl Newton - Consultant Paediatric Neuropsychologist - spoke about the invisible injury of children with brain injuries 

We are grateful to all who attended the day and hope the programme offered food for thought for all.

As part of the programme we were delighted to welcome Louise Wilkinson and Lucy Perkins from CBIT (Child Brain Injury Trust). This fantastic charity work closely with the injured child and their family, providing support and information, helping to access appropriate services and educating schools about their role in the rehabilitation process for a brain injured child.

The charity has regional family liaison and support coordinators all over the country who can help and support injured children and ensure as far as possible their needs are met. Lucy is the Thames Valley Coordinator and we were delighted she could join us to talk about the focus of her work with local families.

We are focused on providing treatment, care, and support to brain-injured children and their families but not all families will have the financial support of a claim and therefore CBIT coordinators play a vital role in trying to plug this gap and signpost children and families to local services.

We look forward to working with CBIT in the future and will be signposting clients to them for help where extra support is needed.

Our next fund raising event for the charity will be a GloZumba event held locally to raise awareness about their latest child safety campaign. Be safe. Be seen.

If you would like to support the event or join us please contact Claire Roantree for more information. 

The Orbiteers Abseiled for Headway

Congratulations to the Boyes Turner Orbiteers and our very own Thomas Green who represented the Court of Protection team in abseiling down from the Arcelor Mittal Orbit. The Orbit is the UK’s largest freefall abseil from which you can see London 262 feet above the City. The structure is one of the most striking visual legacies of the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic games.

 

Thomas has only been with us for two months but bravely stepped in at the last minute to fill the position of someone who reluctantly withdrew. You can see from the photos that the weather was very kind which was particularly welcome, bearing in mind the height that they abseiled down from.

Funds were raised for Headway which is a fabulous charity working to improve life after brain injury. A brain injury can challenge every aspect of a person’s daily life from walking, talking, thinking and feeling. As Headway state ‘it can mean losing both the life you once lived and the person you once were’.

In many cases a brain injury can be a ‘hidden disability’ so that it is difficult to tell from a person’s outward appearance that they do have a disability. One of the ways that Headway are trying to assist in such a situation is to produce a Brain Injury Identity card so that the police and anyone assisting a brain injured person can identify the fact that they have a brain injury and ensure that they receive the appropriate support. The card is personalised and explains the effects of the brain injury and the support required. These can be obtained from the Headway website www.headway.org.uk.

Headway help people rebuild their life following a brain injury and increase their confidence - hopefully the funds our team raised will assist with this. Thomas said

“It was a wonderful experience which raised money for a good cause and I would definitely love to do it again!”

Cycle-Smart Foundation's 20th Anniversary

We were invited to the Cycle Smart Foundation's 20th Anniversary Grand Gala Dinner and had a wonderful time celebrating the work of this long standing and influential charity. 

What is Cycle Smart?

Cycle Smart Foundation is a charity dedicated to saving young people’s lives by promoting all aspects of safer cycling, in particular, the use of cycle helmets.

They were founded by Angie Lee, a former paediatric nurse, who through her work, saw the devastation that head injury caused not only to the child but to the family and friends.

Since its conception the charity has grown in its drive and commitment to advocate for children and young people. It is a national resource working with parents, teachers, police, road safety officers, government departments, healthcare professionals and children themselves by promoting and providing educational programmes in schools throughout the UK and Northern Ireland.

20th Anniversary Grand Gala Dinner

Cycle Smart recently celebrated their 20th Anniversary in style! Angie was joined by over 150 guests and, via pre-recorded videos, by David Coulthard and Aaron Heslehurst who both gave their support and congratulations on the anniversary and offered auction prizes.

Guests were entertained by a magician and DJ and partook in a raffle and auction. There were some fantastic prizes which included a VIP ticket to be the guest of David Coulthard at this year’s British Grand Prix, 2 night stay at Portforton Castle and a trip in a 1908 Silver Ghost and a week-long stay in a villa in the Algarve.

Maisie and her mum Jane Godden-Hall were also in attendance; Maisie is a teenage campaigner for the mandatory wearing of cycle helmets by children. If you want to learn more you can watch the video she made with Hampshire police and sign her petition.

Angie commented:

“a fantastic and successful evening raising over £25,000 for the Foundation in its 20th year. The evening not just raised funds, but celebrated our achievements among friends and families affected by the tragedy caused by a cycle accident”

Boyes Turner supports Cycle-Smart Foundation, a local Reading charity who campaign for safer cycling particularly amongst younger children.

If you or someone you know has been seriously injured following a cycling accident please contact us by email piclaims@boyesturner.com for a free no obligation advice on pursuing a personal injury claim.

Cycle Smart Foundation: The 5 S's event, Friday 27 April 2018

As specialists in brain injury and severe disability claims, Boyes Turner’s personal injury lawyers are active supporters of the Cycle Smart Foundation which campaigns for child safety, the prevention of accidents and reduction of injury. 

Boyes Turner have been working with the charity’s founder, Angie Lee, to promote safer cycling for children by encouraging them to wear well-fitted cycle helmets properly. Learn more about the 5 Ss campaign here.

Cycle Smart Foundation celebrates its 20th anniversary in May 2018. To mark the event, personal injury partner and Cycle Smart trustee, Claire Roantree, was delighted to host the charity’s ‘5 Ss’ research meeting which gathered representatives from local councils in Berkshire and the South East, the Department for Transport, Hampshire & Thames Valley Police, CCG, Child Accident Prevention Trust, Royal Berkshire Hospital, Brain Injury Group,  Brake, Headway UK and Circle Hospital Reading to review and discuss data collected by Cycle Smart over the last 12 months relating to children’s cycling habits.

The charity carried out national questionnaire surveys in 2017 which looked at the cycling behaviour of children aged five to seven, seven to nine, and ten to 14, and studied attitudes in teenage cyclists.  All questionnaires were completed in schools which had been randomly selected but gave a cross-section of child cyclists in England. 

Findings of the study

The study found that although more children walked to school than cycled, there were higher numbers of hospital admissions for pedal cycle injuries than for injuries to child pedestrians.

There was an increase in the number of cyclists aged between five to nine years old. 79% of children in this younger age group own a helmet, compared with only 58% of 11 to 14 year old cyclists. Amongst helmet owners, a higher proportion of younger children wear their helmet than teenagers. Despite owning a helmet, a large proportion of teenagers never wear one.

Should wearing cycle helmets be mandatory for children up to the age of 14?

More children are cycling on roads where there are cars. Amongst primary school children, who are more easily influenced by their parents and teachers, cycle helmets tend to be worn. Secondary school children are more susceptible to influence from social and peer pressures where factors such as, whether their friends wear helmets, whether to do so is uncool or messes up their hair, are deterring them from looking after their own safety and placing them at increased risk of serious injury in the event of an accident or a fall.

Internationally, more and more countries have introduced legislation to make helmets mandatory for child cyclists, including France, 22 states of America, Canada, Australia, New Zealand and Jersey. The obvious implication is that mandatory cycle helmet legislation is considered to be associated with a reduction in head injuries with cyclists of all ages. However, young children are particularly vulnerable to head injury if they fall from their bikes. 

The diverse and experienced focus group discussed the influence of parental control, social factors, demographics, education, peer pressure, the availability of Bikeability schemes and funding issues in Local Authorities.

Cycle Smart promotes the availability of the Bikeability Scheme for all children regardless of background, beginning at an earlier age and continuing into secondary education to promote and maintain better cycling safety habits. Cycle Smart also campaigns for the mandatory wearing of cycle helmets for children up to 14 years of age. 

This push for legislative change is all too frequently met with arguments ranging from the fear that the imposition of mandatory helmets will deter people from cycling if they perceive it to be a dangerous sport to concerns about increasing obesity within an increasingly inactive population. However, for those who have seen first-hand the brain damage and lifelong disability that can be suffered by children who are knocked or fall from their bikes, it makes sense to make safety and the protection of their head and brain the overriding priority.

Cycle Smart’s research reveals that the key factors in influencing the behaviour of children of all ages are school rules and the law. Encouragement is needed to create a collective consciousness whereby the wearing of cycle helmets becomes “the norm”. 

In the light of this latest research Boyes Turner await the government’s review of child cycling safety, due later this year in the hope that mandatory increased safety measures will reduce the numbers of children suffering head injuries from cycle accidents in England each year.

 

 

Positive result for mesothelioma claimants in Bussey v Anglia Heating Ltd

We are delighted to read that the Bussey’s appeal has been allowed and that the Judges rejected Technical Data Note 13 as the test in determining the applicable levels of asbestos exposure in mesothelioma cases. 

David Bussey was a plumber. He was exposed to asbestos during two periods of employment so there was more than one defendant to the claim. The claim against Avery Way Electronics Limited settled for £150,000 and the case continued against the remaining defendant, Anglia Heating Limited, with whom he was employed from about 1965 to 1968. During that time he handled and cut asbestos cement pipes (with a hacksaw), swept up asbestos and used asbestos rope for caulking joints. 

When the case first came to trial, the judge ruled that his asbestos exposure fell below the levels set out in Technical Data Note 13 (TDN13). TDN13 was a document issued by HM Factory Inspectorate in March 1970. This stated that criminal liability would not be incurred where the concentration of asbestos dust in the workplace was kept below certain specified limits.

In the case of Williams –v- University of Birmingham [2001] EWCA CIV 12 42, it was held that a claim could not succeed if the exposure was below the levels in TDN13. This made it far more difficult to succeed in obtaining justice for injured victims in low level asbestos mesothelioma cases. The judge in Williams laid down a binding proposition that employers were entitled to regard exposure at levels below those identified in TDN13 as safe, resulting in TDN13 being used as a guide as to what were acceptable and unacceptable levels of exposure in 1974. 

However, the Court of Appeal judgment in Bussey rejects the proposition that employers were entitled to regard exposure levels below those specified in TDN13 as being safe. Lord Justice Jackson says in the judgment that: “TDN13 sets out the exposure levels which, after May 1970, would trigger a prosecution by the Factory Inspectorate. That is a relevant consideration. It is not determinative of every case”. 

The decision in Bussey means that while TDN13 is a guide, it is not the benchmark for asbestos exposure and TDN13 does not establish a safe limit for exposure to asbestos. 

We are delighted that the often-quoted benchmark of TDN13 has now been overturned. 

The case has been sent back to the trial judge for him to re-determine the issue of liability and we are now awaiting that decision.

If you or a family member has been diagnosed with mesothelioma or any other asbestos related disease, we may be able to help. Contact us by email IDClaims@boyesturner.com for a free initial discussion.

Education Bursary - Alison Bain's story

As specialists in mesothelioma and other asbestos-related disease claims, Boyes Turner appreciate the valuable work carried out by the lung cancer nurses who support and care for victims of asbestos exposure during their hospital treatment and palliative care. 

In recognition of the value of their work, the importance of ongoing education and research into asbestos disease and the significant costs involved in updating their knowledge and skills, Boyes Turner offer sponsorship to nurses involved in thoracic oncology via an educational bursary. The bursary is awarded selectively, on application, to a limited number of nurses each year at Boyes Turner’s discretion.

Alison Bain, Lead Clinic Nurse Specialist at Royal Stoke University Hospital, reviews her experience after receiving sponsorship to attend the 2017 Annual Conference of the National Lung Cancer Forum for Nurses (NLCFN).

“The National Lung Cancer Forum for Nurses Annual Conference provides a tremendous opportunity for pollination of new ideas, innovations, learning from past experiences and is an invaluable resource to all that attend.

This year’s conference was fantastic, so I am truly grateful to Boyes Turner LLP for providing funding; without this, I certainly would not have been able to go.

The programme delivered an excellent range of patient centred topics, covering interesting facts, strategic development and interventions. On a personal level, conference highlights included the interactive sessions, debate and Symposium sessions.

Drew Povey was an exceptional motivational speaker; his delivery on leadership and ‘Making THE Difference’ was fantastic and an inspiration to all of us. This was a session not to be missed and something that will be etched on the minds of members for many years to come!

The interactive session on tobacco addiction, with our role, as frontline CNSs, playing a key role in tackling this problem, was entertaining to say the least and stimulated competition within the groups. Likewise, the debate for the right to a HNA was extremely witty, well delivered but also challenged personal opinions and provided an opportunity for reflection.

Consideration for future workforce planning and establishing competencies required for the next generation of Nurse Specialist, debate around the necessity to adapt to the ever-changing environment and push for succession planning strategies as budgets tighten, stimulated many discussions about CNS personal and academic development. Group work created an initial draft of bullet points which were considered to be essential in the validation of lung cancer specific competencies. Other broader issues gave ‘food for thought’ on sustainable and viable working practices, the need to adapt and be creative and how to implement an accelerated diagnostic pathway.

New developments, research and treatment considerations for mesothelioma and NSCLC third generation agents, poster presentations and the general presence of sponsored stands ensured that the event catered for all needs.

A truly enjoyable event, thank you.”

Alison Bain, Lead Clinic Nurse Specialist, Royal Stoke University Hospital

To learn more about our Education Bursary and how you can get involved please contact bursaries@boyesturner.com.

 

Cervical Cancer Prevention Week - RCOG call for increased screening uptake

During Cervical Cancer Prevention Week, Boyes Turner welcome the FSRH (Faculty of Sexual & Reproductive Healthcare of the Royal College of Obstetricians & Gynaecologists) and RCOG’s call for urgent action to increase cervical screening attendance rates.

If you’ve been following Jo’s Trust’s campaign #SmearForSmear you’ll already know the importance and the benefits of regular cervical screening in reducing your risk of cancer. However, NHS Digital have reported that attendance for free, NHS cervical screening during NHS Cervical Screening Programme 2016-17 was at its lowest in 20 years. Whilst increasing numbers of women are being invited for screening, the uptake in the highest risk age group of 25 to 49-year-olds was only 69.6%.

Suggested reasons for the low attendance rate include local authority budget-driven cuts reducing the number of local settings in which cervical screening is offered, such as SRH clinics. Meanwhile, overburdened GPs are missing opportunities to catch those who have missed out by offering opportunistic appointments for screening at their surgeries.

These additional barriers are simply compounding the problem already encountered with existing barriers (such as fear, lack of awareness) which charities like Jo’s Trust are working so hard to overcome, making it more important than ever to raise awareness of the life-saving benefits of attending your appointment and having your smear.

Early detection of abnormal cells is the key to the avoidance of cervical cancer, along with HPV vaccination among pre-teen and teenage girls.

When left undetected and untreated, cervical cancer not only causes death, but leaves its survivors with lifelong physical, emotional and psychological injury.

Join us and Jo’s Trust, this Cervical Cancer Prevention Week, in urging female friends and family to #ReduceYourRisk and join us in promoting cervical cancer prevention by posting your lipstick #SmearForSmear selfie. For details on how to get involved, click here.

Do you know about Young Carers Day?

Across the world thousands of people are reliant upon others for care and assistance in order to get through the day.  The level of care required can range from simple assistance with fetching items through to more complex nursing and personal care needs, such as assisting with washing and dressing, feeding and toileting. 

For those without the benefit of a compensation award for professional care costs, the role of carer is often taken on by a young family member, such as a child, grandchild or a younger sibling. The young carer’s role can be physically and emotionally draining, can limit their social lives and impact on their studies. 

It is estimated that there are approximately 700,000 young carers in the UK. 

To recognise the amazing efforts young carers go to when supporting their loved ones, a national Young Carers Awareness Day is held each year.  This year the event falls on 25 January 2018. The purpose of the event is to raise awareness for young carers and their valuable work, to raise funds to assist them and to ensure professional support is in place to meet their own needs which can become neglected whilst they look after the needs of others. 

Boyes Turner’s personal injury team supports the aims of Young Carers Awareness Day. We recognise the extent to which our seriously injured clients are often dependent on young carers for assistance with everyday living following an accident, providing emotional support and facilitating their rehabilitation.  Where the injury was the result of negligence on the road, in the workplace, at school or in hospital we can help families with the financial hardship and emotional strain of caring for a loved one after amputation, spinal injury, brain damage or other serious injury by recovering the costs of professional or family care, hoists, wheelchairs, specialist beds and other equipment, adapted housing to facilitate integrated family life for the injured person, and much-needed respite for the carers. 

Boyes Turner’s specialist injury lawyers have extensive experience in working with case managers and therapists in conjunction with the family, to ensure that the injured person’s needs are properly met, with the right combination of family and professional support to maximise the injured person’s rehabilitation, independence and quality of life with the support, but not to the detriment, of the family carers.  

If you or someone you know is a young carer and would like some advice or support please visit the Carers Trust website here

This website also has lots of useful information about Young Carers Awareness Day and how you can get involved. 
 

Cervical Cancer Prevention Week - Reducing the Risk of HPV

During Cervical Cancer Prevention Week Boyes Turner are supporting cervical cancer charity, Jo’s Trust, in raising awareness about cervical cancer. The theme of this year’s prevention week is “Reduce Your Risk”, and that of those you care for, by understanding how this devastating condition can be recognised, treated and prevented. 

We now know that the vast majority of cervical cancer cases are caused by HPV, or the human papilloma virus, an infection passed on by any form of sexual contact. So, let’s be clear about a few facts at the outset:

  • 80% of people will be infected with a genital HPV infection at some time in their lives.
  • Your first or only sexual contact with anyone at all can put you at risk.
  • HPV infection does not imply sexual promiscuity or infidelity.

The problem with HPV is that, whilst it is very common, it is a symptomless infection. It can go undetected in the body for many years. Some people’s strong immune systems enable them to clear themselves naturally of HPV. It is not known why some people’s bodies can and others’ can’t. In those who clear the infection, it can take about 12 to 18 months. Smoking is also known to inhibit the body’s ability to clear itself of HPV. When most people with HPV are unaware that they have been infected, it is not surprising that the infection is so widespread. It should be noted that merely having HPV does not in itself warrant treatment, but the silent yet prevalent existence of the infection makes screening for cervical cancer all the more important.

Most forms of HPV are harmless but some high-risk strains can cause changes in the cells of the cervix which, if undetected and treated, will ultimately lead to cervical cancer. If a smear test reveals abnormal cells and high-risk HPV you may be recalled for further examination.

Jo’s Trust estimates that 70% of cervical cancers are caused by just two high-risk types of HPV, both of which can now be prevented (in people who have not previously been infected) by HPV vaccinations which are currently available to girls on the NHS. In 2008 the NHS introduced free, routine HPV immunisation for girls aged 12 to 13, in the hope of protecting them from HPV before they become sexually active. Offered in schools but also available through GP surgeries, the vaccines are over 98% effective in preventing cervical abnormalities associated with the two high-risk HPV strains in women who have the full dose, and in preventing infection with new strains or reinfection of a cleared HPV. They are not effective where the person is already infected with HPV, which is why the NHS is offering immunisation to girls at such a young age.

With research indicating that the HPV vaccine could prevent two thirds of cervical cancers in women under the age of 30 by 2025, assuming 80% take-up of the vaccination, which is now being consistently achieved, there is good reason for optimism that we will succeed in overcoming this devastating condition.

Join us and Jo’s Trust, this Cervical Cancer Prevention Week, in urging female friends and family to #ReduceYourRisk and join us in promoting cervical cancer prevention by posting your lipstick #SmearForSmear selfie. For details on how to get involved, click here.

Cervical Cancer Prevention Week 2018 - Join us in supporting Jo's Trust's awareness campaign #SmearForSmear

From 22nd to 28th January Boyes Turner will be joining cervical cancer charity, Jo’s Trust, in urging women to #ReduceYourRisk - the theme of this year’s Cervical Cancer Prevention Week campaign - support the campaign by sharing your #SmearForSmear lipstick selfies to raise awareness.   

Cervical cancer is the most common cancer in women under 35, with 3,000 new cases diagnosed and 800 deaths from the disease in the UK each year. That’s two women dying each day from a disease that could be prevented in 75% of cases by cervical screening that is routinely available on the NHS for free.

A smear test only takes a few minutes once every three years for women aged 25 to 49 who, by virtue of their age, are most likely to develop cervical cancer, and every five years for women of 50 to 64. For women over 65, routine screening is only available to those who have had abnormal previous tests or who haven’t undergone screening from the age of 50. Every woman who is registered with a GP should be invited for screening. Yet the NHS reports that more than 1.2 million women could be risking their lives by not having a smear test, as attendance for cervical screening has dropped in the last year, leaving test rates the lowest that they have been for two decades.

Whilst the smear test only takes minutes, the impact of cervical cancer can last a lifetime - leaving partners and children bereaved and its treated survivors devastated by side-effects, such as infertility, premature menopause, impaired bowel and urinary function, painful sexual intercourse, fear of recurrence, pain and psychological damage.

Join us and Jo’s Trust, this Cervical Cancer Prevention Week, in urging female friends and family to #ReduceYourRisk and join us in promoting cervical cancer prevention by posting your lipstick #SmearForSmear selfie. For details on how to get involved, click here.

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The service was personal, professional and considered. I was treated so kindly and in the end I knew that not only had I found the right organisation but also the right person.

Boyes Turner client

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